Corona-virus and training
at Sports Therapy UK


17th April 2020.

Since the closure of all non-essential places of work on 23rd March, and the extension to this announced by the government yesterday, we have postponed several practical training courses and contacted all affected students directly. These changes are also noted on the Course Dates webpage on our website.

During this period, we will be offering blended learning including online training for parts and in some cases, all of certain courses.

We remain fully committed to ensuring you have an enjoyable and rewarding learning experience fully supported by our tutors and all staff at Sports Therapy UK.

Information for new students


If you are thinking of studying with us, please see all courses on our website. We have some that may be completed online and others that may be started via virtual learning and continued by attend our training centre when dates are available.

Our online resources include full audio presentation tutorials, comprehensive practical demonstrations on video, self-test quizzes to check your learning, plus tutor support by email, phone and conference calls.

Please note that our full Level 3 and Level 4 Sports Massage qualifications cannot be achieved via the online course alone. All students will be required to attend practical training on dates when available to complete their studies and pass all remaining assessments to achieve their qualification.

We are in close contact with our awarding body Vocational Training Charitable Trust (VTCT) and will continue to conform with their current educational criteria ensuring our students will be eligible for their chosen award upon successfully completing our course.

Information for current students


Please refer to the Announcements on your Canvas online Learner Resource where you will find up to date information of how we are helping students who are at varying stages of their training with us.

We are continuing to monitor the situation and will decide on whether to delay each course at least 2-3 weeks before they are due to run. We will only start to deliver direct contact practical training when restrictions are lifted, and it is deemed safe for us to do so.

It is our aim to provide you with resources and support to continue your journey with us including virtual learning. When our practical training starts again, we will be arranging some additional training days for practise and to help review and hone all your skills.

Contacting Sports Therapy UK


As we are now working from different locations, we encourage you to contact us by email as the preferred choice. We will reply as promptly as we can and appreciate your patience and understanding during this very difficult time. Level 3 VTCT Sports Massage Online Course Instructions

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About Sports Massage

Skills and Techniques...

 

Here we will summarise the four most commonly recognised categories of technique that form sports and many other forms of massage. They include effleurage, petrissage, frictions and tapotement.

 

What is effleurage?

 

The word effleurage derives from the French word, effleurer, which means ‘to skim’. It is a form of massage involving stroking movements with the hands sliding over the skin, and is always used at the beginning and end of as well as in between other techniques during a massage session. The stroking technique of effleurage may be used with varying pressure and speed according to the purpose and stage of the massage. Effleurage includes light stroking, firm stroking and deep stroking
 
Effleurage should be carried out in a smooth, rhythmical and relaxed manner, starting with a light touch at the start of a session and building up to deeper pressure with slower movements for increased circulation and stretching of the tissues later. The hands must be relaxed and follow the natural contours of the client’s body. The technique should not be rushed as you need time to identify and focus on any abnormalities in the tissue that may require further attention later in the session. Quick movements will not help the client relax, and if a tender area is missed it will almost certainly be more painful if discovered later when using deeper techniques such as petrissage.

 

What does effleurage achieve?

 

The aims of effleurage are to:
 
>     Introduce touch to the client
>     Put the client at ease
>     Warm the superficial tissues
>     Relax the muscles
>     Allow the practitioner to palpate and sense the condition of the tissue
>     Stimulate the peripheral nerves
>     Increase lymph and blood flow, and thus aid the removal of waste products
>     Stretch tissues
>     Relax a client before the end of the massage.

 

What is petrissage?

 

Petrissage comes from the French word, pétrir, which means ‘to knead’. The basic petrissage movement is to compress and then release the soft tissue, using either direct pressure or by picking up and squeezing the skin and muscle.
 
Petrissage is generally used to have a deeper effect on soft tissue than effleurage, and includes kneading, squeezing, picking up, shaking (and other techniques described as wringing and rolling, which achieve much the same results).

 

What does petrissage achieve?

 

The aims of petrissage are to:

 

>     Increase mobility between tissue interfaces
>     Stretch muscle fibres
>     Aid the interchange of tissue fluids (see above)
>     Increase venous and lymphatic return
>     Relax muscles
>     Aid the removal of waste products

 

What are frictions?

 

Frictions are small forceful movements applied back and forth over isolated areas using the pads of the fingers or thumbs – utilising considerable pressure compared to the techniques described so far. They are applied adjacent to the direction of fibres and hence, are often referred to as ‘cross-fibre’ frictions. It is vital to understand that such techniques actually disrupt the tissues in order to realign new fibres and therefore must be used sparingly and only when the need arises – see below. Several benefits of frictions may be generated by using deep stroking instead; the subtle difference between the two techniques being slightly less pressure and therefore no disruption caused.

 

What do frictions do?

 

The aims of frictions are to:


>     Separate adhesions between fibres
>     Break down scar tissues
>     Restore elasticity
>     Stimulate vaso-dilation and blood flow
>     Stimulate the healing process
>     Realign new scar tissue.

 

Tapotement

 

Tapotement describes techniques such as hacking and cupping which have their place in massage aimed towards relaxation. Hacking is a technique in which both hands alternately strike the skin with the lateral borders of the fifth finger of each hand. As the other fingers close together on striking the skin, a characteristic sound is made. It is known to stimulate the skin and superficial muscle tissue, preparing the muscle for exercise and hence being an option for pre-competition massage. Cupping involves making an air-tight concave shape with the hand so that, as it strikes the surface, the air caught underneath is compressed, creating a vibration that penetrates the tissues. Char-acteristically, it also creates a vacuum as the hands are pulled away, and therefore by stimulating the superficial tissue can move blood away from deep tissue, a fact which may be considered counterproductive for sports massage. Other techniques achieve most of the same effects, together with additional benefits, more efficiently so tapotement is not widely used.

 

Want to know more?

 

We offer a 1 Day Introductory Course to Sports Massage where we will guide you through the key concepts behind sports massage and provide you with  some basic hands-on skills. You will receive a Certificate of Attendance and if you choose to go on to the full Level 3 course within 6 months, you will receive credit for your course fee. For further details, please go to Introduction to Sports Massage

 
 
 

 

The Complete Guide to Sports Massage...

 

A new edition of the comprehensive, practical handbook for students of sports therapy. Sports massage is the skilled manipulation of soft tissue for: the relief and treatment of muscle soreness and pain; the maintenance...

 

Find out more on Amazon