Corona-virus and training
at Sports Therapy UK


23rd March 2020.

It is clear the gravity of the situation globally and here in the UK is growing. We are all now aware of the immediate ramifications, but also some of the wider implications as we move further on. Inevitably these will increase before things start to get better, and one question everyone is searching for an answer to is ‘when?’ I am not even going to begin debating or trying to guess the answer to this as this would be quite futile. We are therefore preparing for a lengthy period of a national ‘shut-down’ the extent of which is bound to vary from week to week. We will look forward to when the time is right for us to offer practical training here in Hertford and to welcome you back, but we will only do this when the government and the W.H.O. deem it is safe for all concerned.

In the meantime, we will be doing all we can to support you and help you progress your learning in spite of the obvious limitations we are all facing. We recognise the added anxieties everyone will be dealing with over the coming weeks so we will be working hard to help reduce these with regards to your training with Sports Therapy UK. Here are some of the steps we will be taking:

Marking time for assignments:


We are diverting some of our teaching resources to reduce this as far as possible. We will keep you informed of how long to expect before receiving work back.

Practical training:


Where possible we will be recording more instructional videos to substitute the direct contact you would normally have with us. We are assessing each stage of training reached and how much going forward may be substituted by online instruction. We will liaise accordingly with each group to help you progress and will advise you of any variations in the level of direct contact required to complete your course. This will also involve us seeking approval from VTCT. Our aim remains to deliver the highest standards of tuition and to help you become both competent and confident in your professional capacity.

Tutorials:


We are exploring all options for online delivery and will use the most appropriate medium for each tutorial. We will notify each group as we create and make them accessible for you.

Support:


As we will not have the normal interaction with you, we will be using conference calls, skype, WhatsApp, emails, etc to directly support both groups and individuals.

Information:


We will distribute general news via newsletter, Facebook and would urge you to access and read these sources. We will try to generate interesting news and extra-curricular activities to help you through this period, plus tips on how you can interact with your clients.

Rescheduled Practical Training:


There will be a need to reschedule practical training dates. We will do this when we can be a little more confident that any revised dates have a greater chance of going ahead. I realise this doesn’t help when it comes to planning ahead and we would love to reschedule with confidence but that is simply not possible at the moment. We will keep you informed as things change.

Please make sure you continue to read all emails sent to you, and check the announcements posted on Canvas; these will be updated as frequently as necessary and we hope will provide answers to questions most of you are asking.

We look forward to staying in touch with you and wish you well.


Level 3 VTCT Sports Massage Online Course Instructions

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About Sports Massage

Skills and Techniques...

 

Here we will summarise the four most commonly recognised categories of technique that form sports and many other forms of massage. They include effleurage, petrissage, frictions and tapotement.

 

What is effleurage?

 

The word effleurage derives from the French word, effleurer, which means ‘to skim’. It is a form of massage involving stroking movements with the hands sliding over the skin, and is always used at the beginning and end of as well as in between other techniques during a massage session. The stroking technique of effleurage may be used with varying pressure and speed according to the purpose and stage of the massage. Effleurage includes light stroking, firm stroking and deep stroking
 
Effleurage should be carried out in a smooth, rhythmical and relaxed manner, starting with a light touch at the start of a session and building up to deeper pressure with slower movements for increased circulation and stretching of the tissues later. The hands must be relaxed and follow the natural contours of the client’s body. The technique should not be rushed as you need time to identify and focus on any abnormalities in the tissue that may require further attention later in the session. Quick movements will not help the client relax, and if a tender area is missed it will almost certainly be more painful if discovered later when using deeper techniques such as petrissage.

 

What does effleurage achieve?

 

The aims of effleurage are to:
 
>     Introduce touch to the client
>     Put the client at ease
>     Warm the superficial tissues
>     Relax the muscles
>     Allow the practitioner to palpate and sense the condition of the tissue
>     Stimulate the peripheral nerves
>     Increase lymph and blood flow, and thus aid the removal of waste products
>     Stretch tissues
>     Relax a client before the end of the massage.

 

What is petrissage?

 

Petrissage comes from the French word, pétrir, which means ‘to knead’. The basic petrissage movement is to compress and then release the soft tissue, using either direct pressure or by picking up and squeezing the skin and muscle.
 
Petrissage is generally used to have a deeper effect on soft tissue than effleurage, and includes kneading, squeezing, picking up, shaking (and other techniques described as wringing and rolling, which achieve much the same results).

 

What does petrissage achieve?

 

The aims of petrissage are to:

 

>     Increase mobility between tissue interfaces
>     Stretch muscle fibres
>     Aid the interchange of tissue fluids (see above)
>     Increase venous and lymphatic return
>     Relax muscles
>     Aid the removal of waste products

 

What are frictions?

 

Frictions are small forceful movements applied back and forth over isolated areas using the pads of the fingers or thumbs – utilising considerable pressure compared to the techniques described so far. They are applied adjacent to the direction of fibres and hence, are often referred to as ‘cross-fibre’ frictions. It is vital to understand that such techniques actually disrupt the tissues in order to realign new fibres and therefore must be used sparingly and only when the need arises – see below. Several benefits of frictions may be generated by using deep stroking instead; the subtle difference between the two techniques being slightly less pressure and therefore no disruption caused.

 

What do frictions do?

 

The aims of frictions are to:


>     Separate adhesions between fibres
>     Break down scar tissues
>     Restore elasticity
>     Stimulate vaso-dilation and blood flow
>     Stimulate the healing process
>     Realign new scar tissue.

 

Tapotement

 

Tapotement describes techniques such as hacking and cupping which have their place in massage aimed towards relaxation. Hacking is a technique in which both hands alternately strike the skin with the lateral borders of the fifth finger of each hand. As the other fingers close together on striking the skin, a characteristic sound is made. It is known to stimulate the skin and superficial muscle tissue, preparing the muscle for exercise and hence being an option for pre-competition massage. Cupping involves making an air-tight concave shape with the hand so that, as it strikes the surface, the air caught underneath is compressed, creating a vibration that penetrates the tissues. Char-acteristically, it also creates a vacuum as the hands are pulled away, and therefore by stimulating the superficial tissue can move blood away from deep tissue, a fact which may be considered counterproductive for sports massage. Other techniques achieve most of the same effects, together with additional benefits, more efficiently so tapotement is not widely used.

 

Want to know more?

 

We offer a 1 Day Introductory Course to Sports Massage where we will guide you through the key concepts behind sports massage and provide you with  some basic hands-on skills. You will receive a Certificate of Attendance and if you choose to go on to the full Level 3 course within 6 months, you will receive credit for your course fee. For further details, please go to Introduction to Sports Massage

 
 
 

 

The Complete Guide to Sports Massage...

 

A new edition of the comprehensive, practical handbook for students of sports therapy. Sports massage is the skilled manipulation of soft tissue for: the relief and treatment of muscle soreness and pain; the maintenance...

 

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