Corona-virus and training
at Sports Therapy UK


17th April 2020.

Since the closure of all non-essential places of work on 23rd March, and the extension to this announced by the government yesterday, we have postponed several practical training courses and contacted all affected students directly. These changes are also noted on the Course Dates webpage on our website.

During this period, we will be offering blended learning including online training for parts and in some cases, all of certain courses.

We remain fully committed to ensuring you have an enjoyable and rewarding learning experience fully supported by our tutors and all staff at Sports Therapy UK.

Information for new students


If you are thinking of studying with us, please see all courses on our website. We have some that may be completed online and others that may be started via virtual learning and continued by attend our training centre when dates are available.

Our online resources include full audio presentation tutorials, comprehensive practical demonstrations on video, self-test quizzes to check your learning, plus tutor support by email, phone and conference calls.

Please note that our full Level 3 and Level 4 Sports Massage qualifications cannot be achieved via the online course alone. All students will be required to attend practical training on dates when available to complete their studies and pass all remaining assessments to achieve their qualification.

We are in close contact with our awarding body Vocational Training Charitable Trust (VTCT) and will continue to conform with their current educational criteria ensuring our students will be eligible for their chosen award upon successfully completing our course.

Information for current students


Please refer to the Announcements on your Canvas online Learner Resource where you will find up to date information of how we are helping students who are at varying stages of their training with us.

We are continuing to monitor the situation and will decide on whether to delay each course at least 2-3 weeks before they are due to run. We will only start to deliver direct contact practical training when restrictions are lifted, and it is deemed safe for us to do so.

It is our aim to provide you with resources and support to continue your journey with us including virtual learning. When our practical training starts again, we will be arranging some additional training days for practise and to help review and hone all your skills.

Contacting Sports Therapy UK


As we are now working from different locations, we encourage you to contact us by email as the preferred choice. We will reply as promptly as we can and appreciate your patience and understanding during this very difficult time. Level 3 VTCT Sports Massage Online Course Instructions

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The Treatment Room
Tips, tricks and advice for you as Sports Therapy Practitioners.

Welcome to The Treatment Room where we will add tips and advice that may be useful to you as practitioners within your chosen field. If you have any you would like to share, please send them to tim@sportstherapyuk.com and we may publish your top tip soon. To receive notification of future posts to our Treatment Room please Like our Facebook page by clicking here.

Recently published research suggests that we should modify well-established injury management protocols by introducing mechanical loading of the affected tissues much earlier than previously accepted.

These muscles play a vital role in ankle stability as well as balance so here is a brief overview of how to approach and treat the Fibularis or Peroneals.

The following article is founded on research conducted at the Division of Sports therapy & Rehabilitation at the University of Bedfordshire, Luton, LU1 3JU. The full Research article is available to view under Student Centre/Learning Resources on this website.

In demonstrating examination procedures of various joints throughout the body, inevitably on occasions positive signs are found upon applying specific tests. Recently, when testing for gleno-humeral laxity using the sulcus sign, we have observed two subjects who have displayed joints that sublux. In both instances there has been no previous history of trauma and there is no discomfort experienced on either subluxation, or reduction of the joint. They may each be classified as 3rd degree subluxations.

Cryotherapy has a potentially wide range of applications during manual therapy treatments. Here is a well known tip on advising clients how to apply ice at home, particularly on a confined and anatomically uneven area such as the ankle (round either malleoli). A gel ice pack will of course, conform with the shape; another method is to use a polystyrene cup filled with ice.

When presented with a haematoma, the most important assessment is to determine whether it is inter or intra-muscular, the latter having the greater potential for complications if not treated correctly. If the fascia surrounding the muscle is damaged (inter-muscular), this will allow the exudate to spread widely allowing the body to reabsorb and remove these fluids more easily. The superficial signs of discoloration are often more evident although the discomfort related to the swelling is usually less.